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MOSS 2007 SAN vs. NAS

  Asked By: Benjamin    Date: Jul 20    Category: MOSS    Views: 1324

Does anyone have any good articles or suggestions that talk about the
use NAS versus SAN for SharePoint? I know this is more of a SQL
questoin, but was wondering if anyone out here had any information. I
found this article support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-
us;304261
which talks about SQL, but again, I am looking for any suggestions
coming from the sharepoint side.

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14 Answers Found

 
Answer #1    Answered By: Delilah Mcpherson     Answered On: Jul 20

I have use the SAN Storage for Storing SQL 2005 database with the MOSS 2007. I
will share my experience,
First Prepare your SAN Space accessible from your server where you installed the
SQL Server 2005. Give the drive name (eg: G) to SAN Space.
Open the tool SQL Server Management Studio
Connect
Expand the Database
You will find the databases created by the MOSS 2007. This is stored on your
Server drive not on the SAN.
Right click the database->Tasks->Take Offline->Detach
Copy the database file from Server drive and Paste it in the folder of SAN Space
Right click on the Database->Attache and provide the location where DB is
stored.

 
Answer #2    Answered By: Gobinda Navalagi     Answered On: Jul 20

We currently use SAN and we are good with it, but recently
the business asked us to look into NAS since it was more cost
effective. I have read enough to say that NAS is not the way to go,
but that has been in blogs and I am trying to find more official answers.

 
Answer #3    Answered By: Rose Silva     Answered On: Jul 20

My general preference is DAS. This could be a very long, drawn out discussions,
but most SANs I see aren't ready for the type of I/O SharePoint will need.

NAS is really bottlenecked by the Ethernet transport, which is basically 1Gb,
and not efficient. This versus SAN that is probably 2-4 Gb and much more
efficient as a transport. So, no to NAS, maybe to SAN, and usually DAS. I like
SANs, don't get me wrong. But, I use SANs when I need what it offers - error
checking, snapshots, replication, etc. Otherwise, I would seriously look at DAS.

 
Answer #4    Answered By: Maegan Ellison     Answered On: Jul 20

DAS is typically faster than SAN in any event - however, if you want
to cluster SQL then you are rather stuck with a SAN on Windows 2003.

Is SharePoint is critical / important to your organisation then you're going to
want to be clustering it I'd have thought ?

 
Answer #5    Answered By: Yahaira Shannon     Answered On: Jul 20

If mirroring was a little more proven and efficient, I would be preaching
MIrroring SQL servers with an aliased instance name. This would help a ton of
things like renaming servers, DR, fault tolerance, etc. I haven't personally
done done a production mirrored set, but I hear it could be more performant. (is
that even a word?)

you can use shared disk between 2 servers and still utilize DAS. not saying it's
the best design. The back-end storage for SQL through to SharePoint is a huge
design issue if you have thousands of users and a few other limiting factors. It
is one often missed in enterprise designs and must be re-architected after the
fact. Search DB and SSP DB can really spin a set of spindles in medium and
larger environments.

 
Answer #6    Answered By: Doris Leach     Answered On: Jul 20

Do you know anything from the supportability standpoint of
Microsoft? What they are looking to see is if we use NAS for backup
storage rather than SAN. I have tried explaining that during the
backup it is very difficult for SQL to work with the NAS.

For sharepoint I am not for using NAS, but this is something that they
have asked me to look into. I also tried to see if it was addressed in
the new Best Practices book, but could not find it there.

 
Answer #7    Answered By: Sumitra 2004     Answered On: Jul 20

A SAN appliance is a block-level device that dedicates a logical disk to the
SQL Server. To the server, it appears as just another local disk, has a
drive letter, etc. SQL talks to the SAN through a host bus adapter or NIC
using Fibre Channel Protocol or iSCSI respectively.

A NAS appliance is a file-level device that provides network shares,
typically using CIFS or NFS. It is mapped to a network drive on the server,
not a drive letter, and communicates using the Ethernet LAN.

Although NAS can be used, Microsoft strongly recommends that you use SAN for
a number of reasons, including performance. See
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/304261 for more information.

 
Answer #8    Answered By: Bhairavi Damle     Answered On: Jul 20

Sorry, I answered before reading your other post that said you had read the
Microsoft KB article. I can;t stress enough that this is a bad practice. Be
sure that you have consulted your proposed NAS storage vendor before going
down this path. I can pretty much guarantee that you will have more problems
with SQL if you do this.

Who makes your current SAN? Which NAS device are you considering?

 
Answer #9    Answered By: Leeann Hull     Answered On: Jul 20

We use EMC SAN for Tier 2 & 3. As for the NAS they would like for us
to use Net App DS8300 here and in our DR location a N5300/5600.

 
Answer #10    Answered By: Vaasu Radhakrishna     Answered On: Jul 20

All of these are really good storage systems, but the DS8300 is an IBM
system, not NetApp. If it were NetApp, you wouldn't have to buy anything
else. It runs NAS and SAN on the same box!

I suggest that you talk to your IBM rep before going the NAS route. They can
advise you better on running SharePoint/SQL on their appliances.

 
Answer #11    Answered By: Brinda Bca     Answered On: Jul 20

I have use the SAN Storage for Storing SQL 2005 database with the MOSS 2007. I
will share my experience,

First Prepare your SAN Space accessible from your server where you installed the
SQL Server 2005.. Give the drive name (eg: G) to SAN Space.

Open the tool SQL Server Management Studio
Connect
Expand the Database
You will find the databases created by the MOSS 2007. This is stored on your
Server drive not on the SAN.
Right click the database->Tasks->Take Offline->Detach
Copy the database file from Server drive and Paste it in the folder of SAN Space
Right click on the Database->Attache and provide the location where DB is
stored.

 
Answer #12    Answered By: Sheryl Velez     Answered On: Jul 20

i have a question, how will we make the sharepoint know that db is moved into
SAN space?

 
Answer #13    Answered By: Alexandra Lewis     Answered On: Jul 20

I would say this is not really a sharepoint config. This is more of a
SQL config as to where the DB will reside.

 
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