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Couple of SP Designer questions/creating site templates/MPs

  Asked By: Jody    Date: Jun 07    Category: MOSS    Views: 2053

Couple more specific questions now that I'm diving a bit deeper into SP
Designer.

1) What is MVP.master?

I'm on Chapter 6 of the 'Real World Sharepoint 2007' and wanting to go
through the tutorial on modifying a Master Page via SP designer. Page
154, step 5 says "Download the file 'mvp.master' from the resource
location."

I have no idea what that refers to. Anyone know? I see a reference to
MSDN's minimal master page here:

msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa660698.aspx

Is that the same thing?

2) Can we use VB.net safely throughout? I'm noticing that MOSS and most
all of the built in MPs, and page templates and parts, etc, are all C#
based. Can we proceed with making our own VB.net master pages or is that
going to cause issues mixing the languages down the road? I'm all for
learning C#, but that'll involve a cultural change here and need to know
if we really need to go that route before pushing for it.

3) I think I have a more specific example of the kind of web part
sharing cross-sites need I might have:

Our top level site will mainly be a number of 'gateway' pages which are
merely large indexes of links that take people down into specific
department sub-sites. For each gateway page on the top level site, I'd
like to have it appear on a menu. I assume one of the menu web parts
will accommodate just this. So, I'll have a left menu that links to each
of the pages on this top-level site.

Now, what if I want this exact same menu to also appear on the left of
all the sub-sites. Is there a way to have these sites all point/share
the same web part so that when a page is added to the top level site, a
menu item is added to the left menu of all sites and sub sites?

Share: 

 

3 Answers Found

 
Answer #1    Answered By: Travis Turner     Answered On: Jun 07

1) There is a download site  associated with the book. If you go to
that download site you can download ZIP files of code for each chapter.
Chapter 6 includes a file called custom.master and there is an errata on
the site stating that this is actually the mvp.master file. The
downloads are available here:

www.wrox.com/.../productCd-0470168358" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">www.wrox.com/.../productCd-0470168358,descCd-downl
oad_code.html
<www.wrox.com/.../productCd-0470168358" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">www.wrox.com/.../productCd-0470168358,descCd-down
load_code.html>

2) It is safe to use VB.NET for SharePoint programming. However,
most of the work you will do with a Master Page is declarative and not
C# or VB. Since code is compiled to MSIL, after compiling there is no
difference between VB and C#. it's only when you aren't compiling to
separate dll's that you can have a problem

3) To modify the QuickLaunch menu of a site you should look into
changing the SiteMapProvider that is being used. You can even write
your own SiteMapProvider if you want to completely customize what is
being displayed.

 
Answer #2    Answered By: Noah Carr     Answered On: Jun 07

> 1) There is a download site  associated with the book. If you go to
> that download site you can download ZIP files of code for each
chapter.
> Chapter 6 includes a file called custom.master and there is an errata
> on
> the site stating that this is actually the mvp.master file. The
> downloads are available here:

Aha! Now it all makes sense. I do hope Wrox hires proofreaders some day.
I don't think I've bought a single Wrox book that hasn't had an
extensive errata index.

> it's only when you aren't compiling to
> separate dll's that you can have a problem

Are there any example scenarios where one may NOT be compiling to
separate DLL's when developing within SharePoint? I can't think of time
you'd do that outside of SharePoint, but maybe there's an instance that
you would within MOSS?

> 3) To modify the QuickLaunch menu of a site you should look into
> changing the SiteMapProvider that is being used. You can even write
> your own SiteMapProvider if you want to completely customize what is
> being displayed.

Will do. Regarding the second part of that question, would that mean I
wouldn't necessarily share the same web part amongst the sub sites but
rather each of the navigation parts in each of the subsites would all
use the same SiteMapProvider to maintain consistency?

 
Answer #3    Answered By: Skyler Poole     Answered On: Jun 07

> 1) There is a download site  associated with the book. If you go to
> that download site you can download ZIP files of code for each
chapter.
> Chapter 6 includes a file called custom.master and there is an errata
> on
> the site stating that this is actually the mvp.master file. The
> downloads are available here:

Aha! Now it all makes sense. I do hope Wrox hires proofreaders some day.
I don't think I've bought a single Wrox book that hasn't had an
extensive errata index.

Reply> Having done a chapter of the first book released for SharePoint
2007 development I can feel their pain. Proofreading and meeting
publishing deadlines seems to be mutually exclusive.

> it's only when you aren't compiling to
> separate dll's that you can have a problem

Are there any example scenarios where one may NOT be compiling to
separate DLL's when developing within SharePoint? I can't think of time
you'd do that outside of SharePoint, but maybe there's an instance that
you would within MOSS?

Reply> The only one I can think of would be if you were writing a web part
to encapsulate an existing .ascx control. There are ways to have the
code beside for the .ASCX control added to the DLL of the webpart. But
normally it won't be an issue because everything is compiled to separate
dlls.

> 3) To modify the QuickLaunch menu of a site you should look into
> changing the SiteMapProvider that is being used. You can even write
> your own SiteMapProvider if you want to completely customize what is
> being displayed.

Will do. Regarding the second part of that question, would that mean I
wouldn't necessarily share the same web part amongst the sub sites but
rather each of the navigation parts in each of the subsites would all
use the same SiteMapProvider to maintain consistency?

Reply> That's exactly the point. You can create one webpart that uses
different Sitemapproviders when instantiated on different websites.
That's what quicklaunch does now. Or you could create multiple
different styled webparts that use the same Sitemapprovider and display
the same information in different fashions.